drinking from His cup

The Last Supper – Philippe de Champaign c.1652

 

”Ye know not what ye ask: can ye drink of the cup that I drink of? and be baptized with the baptism that I am baptized with?”


μάρτυς
martus
mar’-toos
Of uncertain affinity; a witness (literally [judicially] or figuratively [generally]); by analogy a “martyr”: – martyr, record, witness.

Strong’s Exhaustive Concordance and Greek Dictionary


Hebrews 2:14-16

14.  Forasmuch then as the children are partakers of flesh and blood, he also himself likewise took part of the same; that through death he might destroy him that had the power of death, that is, the devil;
15.  And deliver them who through fear of death were all their lifetime subject to bondage.
16.  For verily he took not on him the nature of angels; but he took on him the seed of Abraham.

In this portion of the Holy Scripture, the writer to the Hebrews is telling his readers why it was imperative hat God became a man. If the Creator was to dye for the creation,  He must Himself, take on flesh and blood, in order to redeem those condemned under the penalty of sin. Believest thou this?

The devil’s power is in the realm of sin and the sting of sin is death, but for the believer in Christ, neither hath any power. So for those, who all their lifetime were afraid to die, no longer in bondage to that fear.

Fear is the emotion that is synonymous with terror. It is quite the norm to fear someone or something that is dangerous, likely to cause pain, or a threat. But in the case of the believer, there resides a Spirit, and that Spirit is greater than one’s fear.

We see evidence of this Spirit in the first century (AD33) witness of Stephen. The account of this testimony can be found in the book of the Acts of the apostles, 6:8-7:60. Stephen was arrested for being a follower of Jesus Christ and doing great wonders and miracles among the people. In his only defense, he gave credence to the fact that Jesus of Nazarath was Yeshua ha Mashiach.

When the religious folk heard such a testimony, they were cut to the heart and they gnashed on him with their teeth in anger. But Stephen, being full of the Holy Ghost (the Spirit that conquers the fear) did not see the dire straits of his circumstance, but looked steadfastly toward heaven and saw the glory of God and Jesus standing on the right hand of God.

The word of God tells us that Stephen was cast out of the city where he was stoned calling upon God and saying “Lord Jesus, receive my spirit”.

This same Spirit was alive and well in the believer’s in the 16th century as well…

 

Thomas Hawkes (Hauker)

Thomas Hawkes came from a respectable family in England. Serving as a page at the court of King Edward VI, he was known as a handsome young man with gentle manners. When he became of age, he entered the service of the lord of Oxford, where he remained for some time, being liked by all the household.

When King Edward died, religion changed, and protestants began to be in danger. Rather than change his faith, he left his position with the lord of Oxford and went back to his own home. Having married while in Oxford, a son was born to him not long after he returned home.

He did not want the child baptized by a Catholic priest and so he put off the baptism for three weeks. His enemies on hearing this, had him brought before the magistrate charged with being unsound in religion. After a hearing he was sent to London and tried before the bishop of London who after being unable to get Hawkes to recant his faith, placed him as a prisoner in the Gate-house of Westminster.

During Hawkes imprisonment, various plans were tried to make him recant – but all proved useless. Thomas’s constant answer to all who spoke to him on the subject was “I am no changeling.” When responding to the Bishop of London who urged him to give up his faith, he said: “No my lord, that I will not, for if I had a hundred bodies I would suffer them all to be torn in pieces rather than I will abjure and recant.”

Unable to get him to recant, they passed the awful sentence of death upon him. To this he firmly replied, that he would rather suffer death than renounce his faith in the gospel.

While in prison waiting till he be taken to the stake, Hawkes was allowed to see his friends. Several of them asked him if it would be possible for him to give them some token to show that a man could suffer the fire without despairing. Hawkes promised, “by the help of God, to show them that the most terrible torments could be endured in the glorious cause of Christ and his gospel, the comforts of which were able to lift the believing soul above all the injuries men could inflict.”

It was agreed between them that if the pains of burning were bearable, the martyr should lift up his hands toward heaven before he died as a signal to his friends.

On April 10, 1555, Thomas was led to the place of execution, where he mildly and patiently prepared himself for the fire, being fastened to the stake with a strong chain about his middle. He addressed the multitude of onlookers, including his accusers, pointing out the sin and dreadful consequences of shedding innocent blood.

After Hawkes had made a prayer, pouring out his soul unto God, the flames were kindled around him, and soon blazed with such fierceness that his speech could not be heart by the flame’s intensity. As the fire burned a long time, his skin was drawn together, and his fingers were consumed, and having not moved, the people thought him dead. Suddenly and contrary to all expectation, Thomas, mindful of the promise he had made to his friends, raised his hands still burning with flames high above his head, and, as if in an ecstasy of joy, clapped them together three times.

A great shout followed this wonderful circumstance, and then this blessed martyr of Christ, sinking down into the fire, gave up his spirit.

The story above, was a compilation from several online sources and the book Jesus Freak –  VOM (Voice Of The Martyrs)Jesus Freak –  VOM (Voice Of The Martyrs

World Christian Trends AD30-AD2200; interpreting the annual Christian mega census, is a report that was compiled by David B. Barrett and Todd M. Johnson in 2001. The report estimated that some 69,420,000 Christians have been martyred between AD33 and AD2000. [1]

While we can’t guarantee the exact number, as there is a lot of muddy water in the statistics, the same is true in cataloguing the murder of the unborn in America since 1973. But we can rest assured of this one fact, Christ knows exactly each and every one that has falling to such horror and they will most assuredly be met with just recompense on that day.

We are living in a day in which we see an vehement unleashing of the anti-Christ spirit. It is pouring its vengeance out against anything associated with YAWEH, whether it be Israel or the Christian faith. This violent spirit is gaining preeminence throughout the world, while all along the church in America is lying in the midst of it’s slumbering-religious spirit. I am afraid that by the time the church in America realizes that the opposition is at its very door step, it will be too late to make preparation to stand.

He that hath ears to hear, let him hear what the spirit saith!

brother malachi

[1] Library of Congress Cataloging-in-Publication Data
World Christian trends, AD 30-AD 2200 : interpreting the annual Christian megacensus / David B. Barrett, Todd M. Johnson ; associate editors, Christopher Guidry, Peter Crossing. p. cm.
Includes bibliographical references and index.
ISBN 0-87808-608-0 (alk. paper)
1. Church history. 2. Christian sects. 3. Ecclesiastical geography. 4. Christianity—Statistics.
I. Barrett, David B. II. Johnson, Todd M. III. Guidry, Christopher. IV. Crossing, Peter.

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