the circle of passion… understanding the radical elements of Islam and Christianity

    pas·sion ˈpaSHən/: noun

    1. strong and barely controllable emotion. "a man of impetuous passion"
    2. the suffering and death of Jesus. "meditations on the Passion of Christ"

    synonyms: crucifixion, suffering, agony, martyrdom [1]

    According to David Barrett et al, editors of the "World Christian Encyclopedia: A comparative survey of churches and religions – AD 30 to 2200," there are 19 major world religions which are subdivided into a total of 270 large religious groups, and many smaller ones. [2]

    The circle of passion above is an illustration of how I see the religions in all of the world.The blue portion of the circle, which makeup all the known religions, comprise Judaism, Hinduism, Buddhism, Muslims, Chinese and Catholics, Orthodox and Protestant Christianity, etc…

    The blue portion of the graphic representing the ‘world of religion’ is a picture of what the Coexist Foundation and the Chrislam Movement is all about. [3]  Their  ultimate goal is for all the religions of the world to coexist in peace and harmony. Dwelling in a warm, cozy community without conflict, while joining hands and singing a round of kumbaya my lord, kumbaya. For the most part the vast majority of the world religions have no problem with this concept, except for a couple of radical segment of Islam and Christianity.

    A careful examination of the circle of passion reveals two very small slivers which are located at the extreme edges. Even though they are part of the larger circle, they are distinct from the larger, vast majority of religionist. These slivers would be considered outside the norm of their respective religion, and labeled as radical or extremist. It is hard to understand what the actual percentage of the smaller slivers are in relationship to the majority, but we can surmise they are miniscule in comparison to the majority.

    The religionist that are within these smaller slivers are not only smaller in number, but possess a different conviction than those in the larger area of the circle. The conviction of the patrons in the slivers are so strong and determined they are willing to die for these  convictions. In order to understand these radical elements we must understand some foundational teachings of Islam and Christianity.

    Islam:

    Shahid or Shaheed (Arabic: شهيد,‎ šahīd, plural: شُهَدَاء šuhadāʾ ) originates from the Qur’anic Arabic word meaning "witness" and is also used to denote a "martyr." It is used as an honorific for Muslims who have died fulfilling a religious commandment, especially those who die wielding jihad, or historically in the military expansion of Islam.

    The word shahid in Arabic means "witness". Its development closely parallels that of Greek marturos "witness", the origin of the term martyr. Shahid occurs frequently in the Quran in the generic sense "witness", but only once in the sense "martyr; one who dies deliberately for his faith"; this latter sense becomes standardized in the hadiths. [4]

    Christianity:

    Mat 10:34  Think not that I am come to send peace on earth: I came not to send peace, but a sword.
    Mat 10:35  For I am come to set a man at variance against his father, and the daughter against her mother, and the daughter in law against her mother in law.
    Mat 10:36  And a man’s foes shall be they of his own household.
    Mat 10:37  He that loveth father or mother more than me is not worthy of me: and he that loveth son or daughter more than me is not worthy of me.
    Mat 10:38  And he that taketh not his cross, and followeth after me, is not worthy of me.
    Mat 10:39  He that findeth his life shall lose it: and he that loseth his life for my sake shall find it.

    1Pe 4:12  Beloved, think it not strange concerning the fiery trial which is to try you, as though some strange thing happened unto you:
    1Pe 4:13  But rejoice, inasmuch as ye are partakers of Christ’s sufferings; that, when his glory shall be revealed, ye may be glad also with exceeding joy.
    1Pe 4:14  If ye be reproached for the name of Christ, happy are ye; for the spirit of glory and of God resteth upon you: on their part he is evil spoken of, but on your part he is glorified.
    1Pe 4:15  But let none of you suffer as a murderer, or as a thief, or as an evildoer, or as a busybody in other men’s matters.
    1Pe 4:16  Yet if any man suffer as a Christian, let him not be ashamed; but let him glorify God on this behalf.
    1Pe 4:17  For the time is come that judgment must begin at the house of God: and if it first begin at us, what shall the end be of them that obey not the gospel of God?
    1Pe 4:18  And if the righteous scarcely be saved, where shall the ungodly and the sinner appear?
    1Pe 4:19  Wherefore let them that suffer according to the will of God commit the keeping of their souls to him in well doing, as unto a faithful Creator.

    The radical patrons in the two slivers are not only located 180  degrees of each other, their conviction are just as diametrically opposed. Radical Islam lives to kill. Taking innocent life is no problem for this violent segment of Islam and if their own death is required during the Shahid, they willingly die. Those dwelling in the radical Christianity sliver do not take innocent life. They are generally the innocent lives that are taken by the violent, Islamic extremist, yet they are willing to die for the cause of the gospel and the testimony of their Christ.

    Now every patron of Islam does not have the conviction to “die wielding jihad or for the expansion of Islam” nor every Christian to be “reproached for the name of Christ”. The blue portion of the circle of passion is reserved for them to coexist in peace, but those that inhabit the slivers are fully committed… even to death!

    Though the inhabitants of the slivers have similar convictions and commitment, their end  is quite different. Wherefore let them that suffer according to the will of God, commit the keeping of their souls to Him in well doing, as unto a faithful Creator.

     

    “A man who does not have something for which he is willing to die, is not fit to live.” ― Martin Luther King Jr.

    King was assassinated on April 4, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee, for his efforts to end segregation and racial discrimination through civil disobedience and other non-violent means.

    The ONLY true peace, in both this life and the one to come is in Yeshua:

    brother malachi

    [1] https://www.google.com/#q=meaning+of+passion

    [2] David B. Barrett, et al., "World Christian Encyclopedia : A Comparative Survey of Churches and Religions in the Modern World," Oxford University Press, (2001).

    [3] https://awordfrommalachi.com/2014/10/11/a-common-word-chrislam/

    [4] http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shahid

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